SKATEBOARD Sessions ESSENTIAL INFORMATION

Open Skate

Inside the SKATEBOARD gallery space, you will find a ramp designed by Betongpark with the exhibition curator and skateboarder Jonathan Olivares.

Want to skate the ramp?

• You must pre-book your one-hour session online, until 4pm the day before your visit.

• Open Skate sessions are for experienced skaters aged 16+ and during the winter half term we will be running special sessions for younger skaters. Please keep an eye on this page for tickets on sale.

• The ramp is open for skateboard sessions only, no rollerblades, scooters or bikes.

On this page you will find all you need to know.

OPEN SKATE SESSIONS FOR 16+

In order to book an Open Skate (16+) session, you must:

Open Skate sessions are available daily at 11am and 3pm.

• Book an Open Skate session ticket which gives you one hour in the ramp plus access to the exhibition on the same day – all skaters must pre-book a slot online – for health and safety reasons, we can't let you turn up to skate without following this procedure.

• Be an experienced skater and able to ‘drop in’. The ramp is of wooden construction, 3.5ft ramp, with 7.5ft extension.

• Disclose any health issues, sign the waiver and watch the briefing video you'll receive when booking

• Be comfortable with exhibition visitors watching, taking photos or filming you on the ramp

• Be aware that you might share the ramp with up to 5 other skaters during your session

• Be respectful of the environment and follow the guidance of the museum staff

• Be advised that wearing a helmet and other pad equipment is strongly recommended

• Be aware that the ramp is open for skateboard sessions only, no rollerblades, scooters or bikes

• Be sure that you can bring your own skateboard and that:

– Your skateboard is practical for riding the ramp i.e. no penny boards/longboards

– You recognise the risks of injury involved and that you enter the skatepark at your own risk

Book online

Booking Information

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ALL VISITORS WHO WISH TO SKATE ON THE RAMP MUST PRE-BOOK AN OPEN SKATE SESSION TICKET IN ADVANCE.

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MEMBERS GO FREE
Design Museum Members gain free access to the exhibition at any time without pre-booking but in order to skate on the ramp, all members must be aged 16+, be able to drop in, sign a waiver, and pre-book am Open Session in advance.

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• For further questions get in touch with the Bookings team: bookings@designmuseum.org

Share your visit with us using the hashtags #DesignMuseumRamp #SkateboardExhibition

FURTHER INFORMATION

FAQ

What is Open Skate?
Open Skate are one-hour sessions where the public can pre-book to skate the ramp in the Skateboard exhibition gallery.

How do visitors book an Open Skate session on the ramp?
For safety reasons, you can only book Open Skate sessions in advance because of the information we require. Please note that the sessions are available to book up until 16:00 of the day before your visit.

How many people can skate the ramp?
Up to 6 people can skate the ramp in a session.

What if I want to come back to do Open Skate?
Good news – you can! If you already bought a ticket for the exhibition and didn’t get a chance to skate, you don’t need to buy another ticket – simply email bookings@designmuseum.org with proof of purchase and we can arrange an Open Skate session for you.

Who can book Open Skate sessions?
The ramp is for advanced skaters so you must be able to ‘drop in’, because of the design of the ramp. You also must be aged 16 or older – the age limit is due to safeguarding reasons.

Will there be equipment available for people to borrow or hire?
No, you must bring your own skateboard (mandatory). Protection equipment such as helmet, knee and elbow padding are highly recommended.

I’m not skating – can I bring my board into the gallery?
Yes, but we also have lockers at a £1 coin (non-refundable) charge if you prefer.

I’m skating – where can I leave my belongings?
In the corner of the room where the ramp is there is space for bags and coats. The doors to the ramp will always be shut while you’re skating, but you can also use the lockers provided for £1 (coin) if you prefer.

Can I leave the ramp area during the session
Yes, you can go out for a toilet break or to visit the cafe. You must be mindful that no one is skating when you open the gate to exit.

Can visitors eat food and drink in the ramp area?
Because this is a gallery environment, only water is permitted in the ramp area and you must inform a member of staff of any spillages for safety reasons.

Can visitors film and photograph the Open Skate sessions?
Yes – all skaters are informed that visitors may film and photograph the sessions for non-commercial usage, and they might share these images on their social media.

What should I do when I get to the museum for my session?
– Please check in at the entrance to the exhibition where you will receive a wristband. Please wear it throughout your skate session.
– Skateboarding is only permitted in the ramp area. Only one skater is allowed to drop in at a time when on the ramp (each slot accommodates up to 6 people), always wait for your turn.
– Look after your stuff while you skate.
– You may be photographed or filmed by visitors to the exhibit for non-commercial use.
– A member of staff will be present around the ramp area.
– If you have an accident or if you notice any problems with the ramp, e.g. a water spillage please alert a member of staff.
– You can use the ramp during the one-hour booked session only.
– Please return your wristband to the staff member at the entrance to the exhibition as you leave.

We hope you enjoy the exhibition and your session!

MEMBERS GO FREE

Join membership

Members gain free access to the exhibition at any time and can book Open Skate sessions without any extra cost. Become a member to gain unlimited access to all exhibitions for a year plus discounts in the shop and cafe. Student and Gift Membership are also available – give a loved one a year of design and free Open Skate sessions until the Summer!

The exhibition

SKATEBOARD

The first major UK exhibition to map the design evolution of the skateboard from the 1950s to today – a story of design, performance and communities progressing together.

Exhibition Partner

“Converse, which has been adopted by skateboarders for more than 75 years, leaned on its heritage and members of its global skate team to support the book and exhibit, from concept to final execution.

The initiative represents Converse’s ambition to provide a platform for experiences that exist at the cross-section of creativity and skateboarding: bridging audiences and interests, while providing useful inspiration.”
Phil Russo, VP of Design and Innovation

Ticket Mate Skate

Thanks to the support of donors Dan Kurzius and Family, we are able to offer a number of free tickets to the Skateboard exhibition for charities and community groups through our Ticket Mate Skate scheme.

About Betongpark

Since 2012 Betongpark has worked passionately to design and construct unique spaces for skateboarding and urban activities. Founded in Oslo before establishing a second office in London, Betongpark is recognised as one of Europe’s industry leaders in skatepark design and construction.

Can't skate?

School of Skate

Get ready to skate in the #DesignMuseumRamp!

If you are a beginner, School of Skate provides progressing group and private lessons, from the basics to a street or transition pathway, learn to skate ramps and to carve bowls or lip tricks and airs. Free lessons available for non-profits and community groups.

Skate Gals & Pals

Since 2021, Skate Gals & Pals has been a vehicle for change in skating making a social impact by championing marginalised communities through sport, art and sustainable community building in England and globally. Their core principles are to empower underrepresented communities in the world of skating and art, grounded in the principles of diversity and inclusivity in sports and culture. Their work provides physical and mental wellbeing through skate lessons, creative activities, training and employment opportunities.

Background image: Design Museum Ramp photographed by Felix Speller.