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Paul Smith

Paul Smith

Paul Smith shop on Floral Street, Covent Garden, London

Paul Smith shop on Floral Street, Covent Garden, London

Man's shirt inspired by a Suttons seed packet from the spring/summer 1998 collection.
Design: Paul Smith

Man's shirt inspired by a Suttons seed packet from the spring/summer 1998 collection.
Design: Paul Smith

A feature on Paul Smith from the February 1993 issue of Esquire magazine

A feature on Paul Smith from the February 1993 issue of Esquire magazine

Paul Smith
Photographer: Julian Broad

Paul Smith
Photographer: Julian Broad

Runway shot from the autumn/winter 1995 Paul Smith men's wear collection

Runway shot from the autumn/winter 1995 Paul Smith men's wear collection

Autumn/Winter 1995 women's wear collection
Design: Paul Smith

Autumn/Winter 1995 women's wear collection
Design: Paul Smith

A Mini car and a shirt from the spring/summer 1995 Paul Smith men's wear collection

A Mini car and a shirt from the spring/summer 1995 Paul Smith men's wear collection

A limited edition Mini customised by Paul Smith

A limited edition Mini customised by Paul Smith

The Westbourne House shop-in-a-house designed for Paul Smith in 1999 by the architect Sophie Hicks in London

The Westbourne House shop-in-a-house designed for Paul Smith in 1999 by the architect Sophie Hicks in London

Paul Smith's store on Via Manzoni, Milan, designed in 2001 by the architect, Sophie Hicks

Paul Smith's store on Via Manzoni, Milan, designed in 2001 by the architect, Sophie Hicks

Paul Smith's Los Angeles store, 2005

Paul Smith's Los Angeles store, 2005

Paul Smith

Fashion Designer (1946-)
Hello, My Name is Paul Smith
15 November 2013 - 22 June 2014

One of the few British-based fashion designers to combine commercial success with critical credibility, PAUL SMITH (1946-) is renowned for his idiosyncratic take on traditional British styling -'classics with a twist' - both in his fashion collections and his shops.

Paul Smith fell into fashion by accident. As a jobless 15 year-old who had left school with no qualifications, he was frogmarched by Harold Smith, his father, into a Nottingham clothing warehouse one day and forced to take a job there as an errand boy.

That was back in the 1960s. Smith, who once described himself as being "okay at design and okay at business but exceptional at neither", has since become Britain's most consistently successful fashion designer whose products are sold in over 200 shops and through 500 wholesale customers in Japan alone, where his label out-sells every other European designer.

Born in Nottingham in 1946, Paul Smith remembered his family home a few miles outside the city centre as "always very comfortable ... excellent mum, quirky dad, an always stable, good relationship". When he left school at 15, his only ambition was to become a racing cyclist until his father hauled him off to the clothing warehouse. "When I look back I realise how influenced I was by Nottingham," wrote Smith years later. "I'd cycle around, there'd be the coal miners, Derby tweeds and the elegance of the country squires. My brother worked for the Post Office and wore that blue cotton drill GPO shirt."

During his first two years at the warehouse, Smith had no real interest in his work there except for the cycle journey to and from his home. It was only after an accident ended his dreams of becoming a racing cyclist, that he flung himself into his job. "Just by chance I met a lot of people from the art college and became interested in things like art and fashion," he recalled. "Back at the warehouse I started to make displays in the showroom ... The boss was really impressed and he gave me all the buying to do for the men's wear when I was still only 17."

When a friend from art college decided to open a fashion boutique in Nottingham, Smith found the premises, decorated them and ran the shop as its manager. By 1970, encouraged by his girlfriend Pauline Denyer, he felt ready to go it alone by ploughing his £600 savings into Paul Smith Vêtement Pour Homme on Byard Lane, a shabby back alley. The rent was 50p a week: just as well given that the first week's takings came to £52. Open only on Fridays and Saturdays, the shop was scented with Christian Dior Eau Sauvage to overpower the smell of Smith's Afghan hound. During the rest of the week, Smith made ends meet from freelance jobs as a window dresser, tailor and stylist. In the evenings, he signed up for a fashion design course.

The only shop outside London to sell labels like Kenzo and Margaret Howell, Paul Smith Vêtement also started selling the pieces that Smith designed himself and had made up by local manufacturers. Then, as now, his clothes were inspired by the traditional British men's wear he admired: everything from his brother's Post Office shirts and the tweeds of the Nottinghamshire county set, to the imported US jeans and bespoke suits in unusual blues or greens that he wore himself. "The hardest thing was justifying the name 'designer' for myself when I only made such simple clothes. I ended up designing clothes that I wanted to wear myself and felt good in. Well-made, good quality, simple cut, interesting fabric, easy to wear. No-bullshit clothing."

By 1974, the shop had outgrown its back alley and Smith moved to bigger premises on the main street. Two years later, he showed his collection in Paris for the first time and searched for a London shop, finally finding it in a tiny bakery in the then-rundown Covent Garden. "The area was completely empty at the time - there was just the tube and a fruit shop. It took me six months to find out who owned it, it turned out to be a retired baker ... I asked if he would sell it and he said he would for about £30,000. I went to Barclays (Bank) in Nottingham and asked if they would lend me £5,000 or £10,000, but the manager didn't like the fact that I had long hair and a red scarf, and wouldn't lend me anything. Then I went to the Yorkshire Bank in Nottingham and they lent me £10,000. My tailor lent me £10,000 and then I went to the baker and said that I only had £20,000 ... I think he lent me some and I got it for around £25,000 in the end."

Having bought the shop, Smith didn't have enough cash to do it up. Three years later he did and the tatty old bakery fittings were stripped out and the shop spruced up into a stark, elegant Le Corbusier-inspired style. As well as clothes, Smith sold quirky penknives, notebooks and pens that he picked up on his travels. His most inspired 'find' was the Filofax, a leatherbound personal organiser he unearthed at Norman & Hill, a tiny company hidden under an East London railway arch.

When the neighbouring shop came up for sale, Smith bought it. As he "didn't have the heart" to rip out the lovely old wooden fittings, he patched them up instead. The extra space was used to sell more idiosyncratic things - old Beano annuals, first-edition books and, after he began travelling to Japan in 1982, comical Japanese toys and gadgets - alongside Smith's clothes. He filled the windows with furniture by designer friends like Tom Dixon and James Dyson's G-Force vacuum cleaner. As a young designer, Marc Newson stopped by to show Smith a watch in the hope of persuading him to sell it. "Paul said: "It's a nice watch, but it's not a nice price", recalled Newson. "He was right. It was too expensive. That was an important lesson for me."

By then, Smith has coined a phrase to describe his style, 'classic with a twist'. "I take ingredients from upper-class tailoring, hand-made suits and so on, and bring them together with something silly," he explained. "So I might bring together a beautiful suit with a denim short. Or use floral prints inspired by old-fashion seed packets for men's shirts, or line tailored jackets with flamboyantly coloured silks, or ask a factory which specialises in V-necked school sweaters to knit them in crazy colours." "It is as though he possesses some inner equivalent of the Houndsditch Clothes Exchange - not a museum, but a vast, endlessly recombinant jumble sale in which all the artefacts of his nation and culture constantly engage in a mutual exchange of code," wrote the US novelist William Gibson of the Paul Smith style.

Smith has since stuck to the same formula, for both his collections and shops, as his wholesale business has expanded and he has opened more shops in Asia, the US and Europe while diversifying into everything from women's wear and watches to perfume. The shops are still filled with first-edition books like Cecil Beaton's autobiographies, 1960s posters and quirky Japanese flea market finds: and their windows are as likely to display Apple's new computer or the latest video games system as Paul Smith clothes.

"The reason I've been successful is because I've just got on and packed boxes and I know that VAT means Value Added Tax not vodka and tonic," Paul Smith wrote in his book You can find inspiration in everything. "I've sold on the shop floor, I've typed invoices. At some point I've done everything, and I've always kept my head above water financially. Nevertheless I'm extremely nervous about becoming a businessman and not a designer."

© Design Museum, 2007

BIOGRAPHY

1946 Paul Smith is born

1970 First shop opens at 6 Byard Lane, Nottingham

1976 First Paul Smith collection is shown in Paris

1979 First London shop opens at 44 Floral Street, Covent Garden, WC2

1982 Second London shop opens at 23 Avery Row, W1

1983 Third London shop opens at 43 Floral Street, Covent Garden, WC2

1984 Paul Smith Ltd. signs licence with Japanese company, American Jacket

1987 First New York shop opens at 108 Fifth Avenue Fourth London shop opens at 41/42 Floral Street, Covent Garden, WC2

1989 First London showroom opens at 7/8 Langley Court, Covent Garden, WC2

1991 Smith receives ‘Royal Designer for Industry’ award Flagship shop opens in Tokyo making a total of 60 shops in Japan

1992 Sales/Press office opens in Paris (May) Sales/Press office opens in Milan (July)

1993 First Paris shop opens at 22 Boulevard Raspail (January) Launch of the first Paul Smith Women’s collection, Spring Summer 1994 (October)

1994 Smith awarded CBE for his services to fashion design (January) Launch of Spectacles collection (February) Launch of Luggage collection (April) Launch of Watch collection (October)

1995 Paul Smith Ltd. awarded the ‘Queen’s Award for Enterprise: International Trade’ (April) Paul Smith True Brit exhibition at the Design Museum in London (October 95 - April 96) Launch of the Paul Smith website - paulsmith.co.uk (October)

1996 Paul Smith True Brit exhibition in Glasgow as part of Festival of Design (September)

1997 Smith awarded the Honorary Freedom of the City of Nottingham (February) Paul Smith True Brit exhibition at the Nottingham Castle Museum (May - August) Women’s shop opens at Sloane Avenue, South Kensington, SW3 (September)

1998 First Women’s show at London Fashion Week (February) Launch of Paul Smith Mini ‘Art Car’ available in the UK and Japan only (April) Westbourne House opens at 122 Kensington Park Road, Kensington, W11 (May) A bespoke tailoring service is offered for the first time at Westbourne House (May) Paul Smith True Brit exhibition travels to Japan (Tokyo, Kobe and Fukuoka) (September) Portrait of Paul Smith by James Lloyd, winner of the BP portrait award, unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery (December) Paul Smith Ltd. and Inter Parfums Inc. sign licencing agreement (December)

2000 Launch of ‘Paul Smith Men’ and ‘Paul Smith Women’ fragrances (June) Smith awarded a knighthood by HM the Queen (November) First shop opens in Milan, at Via Manzoni 13 (February)

2001 You Can Find Inspiration in Everything… book published by Violette Editions (October) Collaboration with The Rug Company

2002 London showrooms and headquarters opens at 20 Kean Street, Covent Garden, WC2 (January) Milan showroom and press office open at Viale Umbria, 95 (January) Smith judges at the Design Museum ‘Designer of the Year’ award (June)

2003 Smith wins the ‘Menswear Designer of the Year’ and ‘Contemporary Designer of the Year’ at the British Fashion Awards (September) Collaboration with Maharam

2004 Launch of the Paul Smith e-commerce site (October)

2005 Smith receives the ‘Great Britons Award for Business’ (January) Collaboration with Triumph motorbikes First Los Angeles shop opens at 8221 Melrose Avenue (December)

2006 Sales/Press office opens in Sydney, Australia (January) Tokyo flagship shop Space opens in Shibuya (April) New York flagship shop opens at 142 Greene Street (October) Collaboration with Penguin Classics to create a limited-edition cover for Lady Chatterley's Lover by D. H. Lawrence Broadway Cinema, Nottingham opens the Paul Smith Auditorium

2007 Smith is awarded Honorary Fellowship of RIBA - Royal Institute of British Architects (February) Smith awarded membership of the Fragrance Foundation 'Circle of Champions’ (November) Collaboration with Mercian Cycles

2008 Globe shop opens at Heathrow Airport, Terminal 5 (March) Signs agreement to design and supply first team and officials with formal wear and accessories for Manchester United Football Club Collaboration with Evian

2009 First Las Vegas shop opens at 3720 South Las Vegas Boulevard (December) Paul Smith Ltd. awarded second ‘Queen’s Award for Enterprise’ Launches a reinterpretation of Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda collection with Stelton Exhibiting in Design Museum and Beefeater 24 present Super Contemporary, Design Museum 3 June - 4 October 2009.

2010 Smith is made an Honorary Senior Fellow of the Victoria and Albert Museum (March) Launch of Paul Smith Junior, a new children’s wear collection (July) Inside Paul Smith exhibition held at the Daelim Contemporary Art Museum, Seoul, South Korea (September - November)

2011 Seoul flagship shop opens at Dosan Park (April) First Japanese Paul Smith fashion show, Spring Summer 2012, shown in Tokyo (October) Smith received ‘British Fashion Award for Outstanding Achievement’ (November) Paul Smith: Gentleman Designer documentary by Stéphane Carrel for Arte (November) Collaboration with Burton Snowboards

2012 Launch of Olympic stamps for Isle of Man Post Office (January) Showroom opens in Dusseldorf, Germany (January) First shop opens in Melbourne, Australia, at 120 Collins Street (May) Collaboration with John Lobb Collaboration with Leica cameras Collaboration with Charming Baker for London 2012’s Britain Creates project Women’s shop opens in Paris, at 32 Rue de Grenelle (December) Showroom/Press office opens in Paris, at 70 Rue des Archives (December)

2013 Beijing flagship shop opens at 11 Sanlitun Road (May) Paul Smith designs the leaders’ jerseys for Giro d'Italia including the Maglia Rosa Shop opens at 9 Albemarle Street, London (September) Hello, My Name Is Paul Smith exhibition at the Design Museum, London (November 2013 - March 2014) Hello, My Name Is Paul Smith: Fashion And Other Stories book published by Rizzoli to coincide with the Design Museum exhibition

Visit the Paul Smith website at paulsmith.co.uk

© Design Museum, 2007

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