located on first floor Free display

Environmental Communications: Seeing Los Angeles in the 1970s

Sprawling and reliant on the car, Los Angeles was never considered an ideal city. But in the early 1970s it started to be appreciated as a city of signs and pop-up buildings – a city to be consumed from behind the wheel of a car. In 1969, a group called Environmental Communications started to document the unique culture of Los Angeles in the name of architectural education.

This free display in the museum’s atrium explores how a collective of architects and photographers started to document the unique changing culture of Los Angeles in the 1970s in the name of architectural education.

Credit: The Good Year Blimp 1971, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Drive-in theatre. courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Neon arch, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Photo by Roger Webster 1971, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Drucilla custom corvet, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Mac Juice billboard 1973, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Big Mama 1974, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: LV Billboard, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: The Isle of California 1972, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Pop architectural structure of dinosaur 1973, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Original McDonald’s 1971, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: 76 sign, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Credit: Zappa billboard, courtesy of Environmental Communications

Related exhibition

California: Designing Freedom

This is the first exhibition to examine California's current global reach. Picking up the story in the 1960s, the exhibition charts the journey from the counterculture to Silicon Valley’s tech culture.

Background image | Beverly Hills intersection 1972, courtesy of Environmental Communications