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Paul Cocksedge
Photo ® Immo Klink.

Paul Cocksedge
Photo ® Immo Klink.

Styrene, 2003
Image ® Richard Brine.

Styrene, 2003
Image ® Richard Brine.

NeON, 2003
Image ® Richard Brine.

NeON, 2003
Image ® Richard Brine.

Pole, 2008.
Image ® Established & Sons.

Pole, 2008.
Image ® Established & Sons.

Veil, 2008.
Image ® Swarovski Crystal Palace.

Veil, 2008.
Image ® Swarovski Crystal Palace.

Veil, 2008.
Image ® Swarovski Crystal Palace.

Veil, 2008.
Image ® Swarovski Crystal Palace.

Life 01, 2009.
Paul Cocksedge
Rendering ® of Flos.

Life 01, 2009.
Paul Cocksedge
Rendering ® of Flos.

Drop, 2010
Image © Paul Cocksedge Studio

Drop, 2010
Image © Paul Cocksedge Studio

A Gust of Wind, 2010
Paul Cocksedge
Image © Mark Cocksedge

A Gust of Wind, 2010
Paul Cocksedge
Image © Mark Cocksedge

Kiss, 2010.
Image © Paul Cocksedge Studio

Kiss, 2010.
Image © Paul Cocksedge Studio

Kiss, 2010.
Image © Paul Cocksedge Studio

Kiss, 2010.
Image © Paul Cocksedge Studio

Paul Cocksedge

Lighting Designer (1978-)


British designer PAUL COCKSEDGE (1978-) creates visually spectacular and technically ingenious lights that celebrate the magical and transformative qualities of illumination. Together with Joana Pinho, he set up Paul Cocksedge Studio in 2004. His output includes lighting for manufacturers such as Flos and Established & Sons, window displays for Hermès and the Wellcome Trust and sculptural installations for the Design Museum and the London Design Festival. The Studio explores the limits of technology and materials. Whether working with complex technology, inexpensive found materials like polystyrene vending machine cups or exquisite hand-made glass, Paul Cocksedge designs and produces visually arresting objects and environments that engage or even invite involvement.

Born in London in 1978, Cocksedge studied industrial design at Sheffield Hallam University and product design under Ron Arad at the Royal College of Art in London. While studying there he met his business partner Joana Pinho and was introduced by Arad to the Japanese fashion designer Issey Miyake and German lighting designer Ingo Maurer, both of whom have staged exhibitions of his work. Maurer went so far as to give Paul a show within his own show at Milan Design Week 2003, introducing 'Styrene', 'NeON', and an early work that was to be developed into ‘Life 01’ for Flos.

Initially drawn to light with its freedom from the constraints of gravity, Cocksedge, produced suspended works including 'Styrene', 'NeON', 'Crystalized', 'Sapphire Light' and 'Veil'.

Thought-provoking and often witty, his self-termed “logically constructed illogical constructs? include 'Watt?', illuminated by joining up the pencil strokes on a piece of paper; 'Life 01', activated by placing a fresh flower in and out of water; 'NeON', fired by single core cabling and 'Pole', a bright light without heat. ‘Kiss’ in Milan and a window display for Hermès are among his recent design installations that have taken his work from lighting into the realm of environmental sculpture.
Producing both commercial and experimental work, Paul Cocksedge has recently been commissioned by the London Design Festival to produce a piece of public art ‘Drop’, a huge magnetic coin-form onto which passers by were invited to place and arrange one-pence pieces. For Corian® and the V&A, an installation of three hundred beautiful curvaceous paper trays. Not lights, these works hint at the future creative direction of the Studio.

© Design Museum, 2010

Q. How did you first become interested in design?

A. I am not aware of a specific starting point for my interest in design and this is partly due to never having an imposed view about ‘design’ or what ‘design’ is. My growing interest in design has been a natural and gradual process. Over time I have found an approach to design which is stimulating and exciting and fits with my personality. Similarly to when I was younger, the path ahead is not prescribed.

Q. When and why did you decide to focus on lighting design?

A. My interest in lighting came from my experiments at the Royal College of Art. On graduation, my work did not feel like finished design, it felt more like the beginning of an ongoing experiment. So far these experiments have progressed into lighting pieces.

Q. Which of your earliest projects were most important in establishing your reputation as a designer?

A. Styrene. As a material and process it has taught me a way of producing design – in terms of form and shape – which is separate from the culture of finished controlled products. It is a collaboration between myself, heat and the natural mystery of the material. As a project, Styrene communicates the energy of its own existence.

Q. What are your main preoccupations in your work as a designer?

A. As a designer I am preoccupied with sustaining the freedom to create, experiment and embrace new works. I see this freedom as essential as it is this freedom that allows me to work in the way that I do.

Q. Can you describe the development of the Styrene light?

A. For Styrene, I first began to experiment with the material by exposing polystyrene cups to heat. To me they seemed to come alive as though they were dancing and transformed from disposable mass produced products to precious unique forms. From here I learnt how to control this process and began to grow sculptural pieces.

Q. Neon?

A. My interest in Neon was stimulated by the idea of sending electrical energy through gas to make light. Something invisible to suddenly glow is a beautiful phenomenon which I wanted to capture in its most pure form, regardless of the technical constraints voiced by sceptics.

Q. Bulb?

A. The starting point for Bulb was never about designing a vase or a light. It was based around designing a piece that brings together three natural elements and combines them to create something magical. At the beginning of the project the idea of ‘when the flower dies, the light goes out’ sounded unreal, but to me this is now clear.

Q. And Watt?

A. The concept of taking a pencil and drawing a switch has been a fundamental motivation for Watt. To utilise the natural properties of a pencil for switching on a light as well as maintaining the principal of purity when designing the object was an important balance to achieve. There were many prototypes and refinements produced and these were driven by my aspiration to create an object which was in harmony with its raw ingredients.

Q. What do you consider to be the main challenges facing a designer today?

A. As a 25 year old establishing myself as a designer, there have been many challenges. The main one for me has been maintaining a climate of freedom and I believe this is an on going challenge for many designers today.

Q. What or who has inspired and influenced your work?

A. My time at the Royal College of Art was inspirational from the outset and this was down to three tutors whose creativity gave me energy, enabling me to be free and excited about design. While at the RCA, I met my business partner, Joana Pinho, whose professional influence impacts greatly on the business. Ingo Maurer (the German lighting designer) was a key factor in helping me make the transition from academia through to establishing myself as a designer.

© Design Museum, 2004

BIOGRAPHY

1978 Born in London

1997 Studies Industrial Design at Sheffield Hallam University

2000 Begins the Design Products course at the Royal College of Art, London where he is taught by Ron Arad

2001 Exhibits his work at the Issey Miyake Gallery in Tokyo and 'Limited Edition' Salone Satellite, Milan.

2002 Graduates from the Royal College of Art.
Exhibits at ‘Designers Block' in London, ‘Milan in a Van' at the V&A in London and 'Tropptypes' with Hidden in Milan.

2003 Ingo Maurer, the German lighting designer, presents Pauls work in an exhibition at Spazio Krizia during the Milan Furniture Fair. Opens a studio with his business partner, Joana Pinho, whom he met at the RCA.

2004 Nominated for the Design Museum’s Designer of the Year prize.

2005 Crafts Council Development Award. '‘Crystallize’ nominated for the Bombay Sapphire Glass Prize Awards

2006 Member of 100% Light advisory panel. ‘Light As Air’ solo show and launch of 77 new limited edition lighting sculptures at Rabih Hage, London.

2007 Applied for his first residential lighting patent. Wellcome Trust window display at the Euston Road, London.
‘Private View’, an installation commissioned by Trussardi for the Salon de Mobile, Palazzo Trussadi Alla Scala, Milan Italy.

2008 Invited to lecture at the Imm Cologne 09, International Furniture Fair on the topic of ‘Colour and Light’.
Invited to speak at the Future Design Days conference ‘Light Now 09’, in Stockholm, Sweden. Designs ‘Pole’ for Established & Sons, UK.

2009 Presents an installation commissioned by Sony to showcase four new Sony Bravia LCD televisions, at Tramshed, London. Invited to officially open Sidney Design Week at the Power House Museum in Australia. Participates in Super Contemporary exhibition at the Design Museum, London. Commissioned by Milan City Council to create a major Christmas Lighting Installation in the heart of the city.

2010 Commissioned for Size + Matter project ‘Drop’ at the South Bank Centre and a ‘Gust of Wind’ installation for V&A Lates both as part of London Design Festival. ‘Pole’ accepted into MoMA’s collection. ‘Swell’ nominated for Elle Decoration’s Best British Design. Leads Design workshop at Domaine de Boisbuchet. Guest speaker at TEDx Munich.

FURTHER READING

Learn more about Paul Cocksedege's work at paulcocksedge.co.uk

All images courtesy of Paul Cocksedge Studio. Contact paulcocksedge.co.uk

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